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Software

The benefits of MAP-controlled thermostats

February 9, 2022

A customer driving a 2014 BMW 328i arrived at the college's 2nd-year electrical lab reporting his illuminated check engine light. The customer had no complaints other than the light. The vehicle had just over 82K miles showing on the odometer. A student (Phil) assigned to the BMW performed a review with a scan tool, and a single code (P0597 – Thermostat Heater Control Circuit Open) was present.
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Tesla aftermarket repair information

October 29, 2021

NASTF has released new information on industry changing news! After 4 years of working together with Tesla, NASTF is pleased to announce that Tesla scan tool and service information is now available to the aftermarket. For the American and Canadian markets (Canadian version is in the final testing stages) things are changing rapidly that's why the National Automotive Service Task Force (NASTF) has brought their best experts to explain how to find, set-up, and implement this new information so you can add this new service opportunity to your shop.
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Electrification and climate control technologies: Are we prepared?

June 3, 2021

A recent survey from CarGurus suggests consumer interest in purchasing an electric vehicle (EV) has doubled in the past three years.
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Time to plug into EV training

March 10, 2021

Read any automotive publication or website, and you will see numerous stories from all the big automotive manufacturers and quite a few shiny new start-ups about vehicle electrification.
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Learn all about electric cooling fan analytics

March 1, 2021

Learn all about electric cooling fan analytics
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Hazmats: Why should I care?

September 21, 2020

Trivia question: what do R-134a, Lithium Ion batteries, air bag modules, and used fuel system components all have in common? Aside from the fact that these are all in-use in today’s vehicles, they are all also classified as Hazardous Materials (i.e. hazmats) by the U.S. Department of Transportation (DOT). The same holds true for these products in Canada, where the governing body (Transport Canada) has similar designations for what they call ‘Dangerous Goods’ (i.e. hazmats).
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