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07Jul

Johnny’s Radiator in Warren, AR is very busy right now and trucks with clogged radiators like this are one reason why! Make sure air flow is not restricted. If you’re…

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11Nov

The Ford owners’ and enthusiasts forums on the Internet are awash in questions and discussions of Ford Motor Company’s recently-announced gradual changeover to a standard coolant for all their engines. Some owners are concerned that their favorite car company has crossed over to “the dark side” and adopted General Motors Dex-Cool, a sure sign of an automotive apocalypse.

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10Oct

The heater control valve (sometimes called the hot water valve) is used to control the rate at which coolant flows through the heater core. The valve is located on the…

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10Oct

Soon temperatures will tumble, sweaters and jackets will come out and in order to be comfortable you’ll choose to turn on the heat inside your car. How does heated air get into your car?

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10Oct

Before draining the coolant, warm up the vehicle until the thermostat opens. Shut the engine off and place a pan under the radiator drain (the petcock) to catch the old coolant. Turning the petcock to loosen it will allow coolant to drain from the radiator. Once the coolant stops flowing, the pressure from the system has been released and you can remove the radiator cap to allow the coolant to drain completely.

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10Oct

Pressure testing is used to check for leaks in the cooling system and to test the radiator cap.

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10Oct

According to MACS member Spectra Premium Industries, a North American manufacturer of many aftermarket A/C and engine cooling system parts, testing for electrolysis is a simple task. Use a digital volt ohms meter (DVOM). Set your meter to DC volts. With the engine off, hook the negative lead from the meter to the negative post of the battery.

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09Sep

One way to check for proper coolant circulation is to check the upper and lower radiator hoses. The upper radiator hose should be hot, around 190–200 °F. (The safest and…

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09Sep

With all the long-life coolants, and even the three-year/50,000 mile conventional coolants, it’s fair to ask: why do we see so many cases of coolants failing at low mileage.

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09Sep

A good flush and fill machine is the most practical way to get out at least 90% of the old coolant. You don’t have a machine and want to do a conventional drain and fill?

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